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This is how I fell asleep at 10am on Friday morning. post-referendum hangover was baaaaaad.
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Anonymous asked:
do many people want the independence of scotland? literally (and sadly), the only thing i know about this issue is that jk rowling wants scotland to stay in the UK and i thought it was a good thing because of her lol

well recent polls have shown about 49% of people do haha. and even the 51% that are voting No to it still want greater powers given to the scottish parliament. In or out of the UK, people here are fed up with the current system we have and want a change

After two years, when I wake up tomorrow I will be able to democratically vote for a choice between two futures for my country. I’ll be able to choose Independence for Scotland by marking a cross in a box, not by picking up arms.

I’m incredibly lucky. When I wake up, I can choose to Imagine A Better Scotland. I can vote YES.

It all starts with an ‘X’

taur:

Ash Stymest
wildbelles:

more like this here x
  • Friend: hey man wanna go out tonight?
  • Me: sorry my anaconda don't
  • My Wee interview with the FINANCIAL TIMES

    What is quoted isn’t at all exactly what I said/meant, but this is my printed moment of fame in a National newspaper. Full article here: http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/b171325c-2f7f-11e4-a79c-00144feabdc0.html#axzz3DXO5N3yM

    “I’m not really thinking about this in terms of identity at all”, says Alex Aitchison, at the venue in Montrose. Aitchison, a newly minted art school graduate and Yestival organiser, is talking to me next to “Gloria Yestivan”, the aptly named vintage Airstream which transports the team from town to town. He was a No voter but was goaded by his family – staunch Labour turned staunch SNP voters – to research the issues at stake in the referendum.

    “I read up and I was like, actually, they [his family] might be right.” What was it that changed his mind? “The democracy argument is the big one for me. Getting governments we vote for and being able to make our own decisions so we can do things differently from England.”

    Isn’t that also about identity? “Scottishness to me is just anybody that is living here right now”, Aitchison says. “The world has been opened to us more than it has ever been through the internet and globalisation.” I take note but I wonder, when anyone can be Scottish, whether the idea that Scotland is different soon dissolves.

    Aitchison was attracted by the new nationalism that has replaced the misty-eyed anger of the early SNP. This rejects the kitsch that too often defines Scotland. “We are a lot bigger than that”, he says, “which is why a lot of people took the hump at the Commonwealth Games.” The opening ceremony in Glasgow in June featured lassies dressed as Tunnock’s teacakes, whirling like dervishes. “It was tacky. I don’t dislike tartan but covering the whole stage in it was a bit much.”

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